Marketing

How To Sell Personal Training On The Gym Floor

Promoting Personal Training Services for Beginners: On the Ground Guidance 

Braving those first few steps towards becoming a self-employed fitness professional? Perhaps you’ve been going it alone as a fitness trainer for some time now, but now need to bolster your client book with new contacts. No matter where you are on the experience ladder, the ability to secure new leads and capture new clients is an invaluable skill. Some of the most experienced fitness sector professionals working for themselves can stumble in the hunt for new clients to add to their book, while rookies to the realms of freelancing can lack confidence to make that first approach and direct market themselves. In both cases, the ripe pickings and profit potential of the gym floor have been overlooked. 

Your fellow gym-goers provide a fertile ocean of profit that’s rarely tapped to its full potential. What’s more, you don’t need a ton of testimonials from happy clients past and present to pitch your services, nor secure yourself a good rate. Below, you’ll find some handy guidance on how to get started in promoting your personal training services in the gym. 

Poster the Place with Personal Training Tips 

With this one, it’s always good to start by thinking about an angle. Promoting yourself with cheap and cheerful posters is an accessible option for those starting out, but you do need to seem like an authority at what you do. Consider using these to promote an effective exercise first-time gym-goers might find useful for targeting problem areas. It’s all about catering to the demographic, their needs and wants, while also ensuring you speak the language they do. For example, resist the urge to get too technical. Avoid long-winded terminology and scientific names for body parts and muscle groups. Keep it colloquial, even quirky. Strike the right chord and you’ve crossed the first barrier in bagging a new client. 

Don’t Forget to Include Links and Contact Details 

Once you’ve composed your marketing mini poster and wrapped things off with a firm call to action, give it the final once over to check for any glaring errors. You’ll also want to ensure your contact details and relevant internet links are clearly printed and easy to read. A quick checklist of things to include: any link to your own website, YouTube channel or major social platforms you regularly update. You might also want to include an email address and/or phone number. However, this is ultimately dependant on the location itself. If you’re comfortable enough at a gym to feel confident enough to poster it, you’ll no doubt have a good idea of whether or not the ownership would be happy to have you selling your services under their roof. 

Establish a Mailing List 

In most cases, an email address or social platform link will be acceptable to the establishment. As such, it’s easy for you to build up a stack of useful contact addresses. Consider drafting up a regular newsletter to send out via email to potential clients. Content to include in this newsletter should be engaging and useful to the reader, rather than a by-the-numbers update of your own routine. Think about regular streams for content like quality recipes to supplement fitness training, spotlights on new exercise practices and so on. It might not seem like this would seal the deal for new clients down the line, but you’re building a reputation and commanding an authority with this slow burn approach with valuable content. Just remember to drive engagement with readers. It’s not enough to simply have them read it, you want them to want to get in touch and hire your services after doing so. 

Showcase Yourself as a Specialist 

When it comes to clients looking for a personal trainer for the first time, the demographic is likely to be largely occupied by one type of person. For example, you’re likely to see employed females aged from their early thirties to late fifties dominate the demographic of those enquiring about your personal training services. This of course isn’t always going to be the standard, depending on where you’re plying your trade, but the thing to remember is to play to your demographic when you promote yourself. Taking the female demographic we’ve just mentioned, consider what types of training they’ll be looking for. Again, most of them are likely going to be seeking professional input to help achieve weight loss goals. Whatever the general profile of your main market, quickly deduce the common denominator and ensure you’re advertising yourself as a specialist to correspond accordingly and capture leads. 

No matter what strategies you decide to implement to engage potential clients and build up your book of happy customers, make sure you’re always making a positive impression. From first impressions and initial consultations, through to ongoing working relationships with established clients, you’ve always got to ensure a feeling of trust and satisfaction in their minds whenever they’re thinking about you. Most importantly of all, be proactive and don’t drag your heels. If you’re fresh off the boat of full-time employment and need to keep your head above water in the freelance ocean, you need to be moving at light-speed to build your business base. If you’re established already, ensuring you’re always developing your services and refining existing relationships will slash the likelihood of you losing custom to competitors, while also shining more brightly against rival trainers.